Connected consumers: risk or opportunity?

New technology and data-driven innovation create new business models and services that enable companies to help their customers by adjusting their products and become more relevant. At the same time, access to and analysis of data challenges the personal integrity and the view of how integrity should best be safeguarded.How shall development of new services and personalisation be balanced with demands of personal integrity? Do consumers have access to relevant information? And who is responsible for what? 

The recipe for a competitive EU

The success of the EU’s can be measured largely in the level of exchange in goods, services, people, and capital. The complete implementation of the Single Market is key. Much remains to be done in many areas, such as the free movement of services and labour, eliminating restrictive national processes, regulations and standards, and ensuring that common legislation is applied uniformly and consistently. As long as barriers to the four freedoms remain, European competitiveness will continue to be held back.

A well-functioning Single Market – Economic engine of the EU

The original purpose of the Single Market was to create a more favourable environmentfor entrepreneurship, the movement of people, competitiveness and trade.Achieving this would stimulate economic growth and increase prosperity for Europeancitizens. This must remain the point of departure for future efforts to developthe Single Market.

The Digital Single Market – prerequisite for data-driven growth

A Digital Single Market is crucial for the EU to make use of ever faster technological developments and achieve economies of scale, as well as innovation and growth opportunities both in Europe and globally. Harmonisation of digital rules, not least relating to consumer rights and VAT systems, is necessary to build such a market.

Leadership in global free trade

European companies need access to markets and open relations with the rest of the world. The EU must use its position as the largest trading bloc in the world to push for free trade, openness and competition on equal terms.

Better regulation creates competitiveness

Improving the quality of European legislation is crucial to strengthening businesses’ competitiveness. This involves optimizing the regulatory framework and ensuring it brings cost-effective results and contributing to more growing businesses and jobs.

Climate and energy policy for sustainable growth

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and so demands a global commitment and comprehensive solutions. The EU plays an important role in driving global measures and ambitions under the Paris Agreement of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

No Social Europe without jobs

High employment levels are a prerequisite for providing European citizens with strong social rights and good living standards. The only way to achieve this is through competitive companies and healthy economies in the EU Member States. These conditions are linked; improved living standards cannot be created without growth.

European Diversity is a strength

A central component of European cooperation is the diversity of ideas and solutions available to address the common problems of our time. Diversity serves the EU well and is vital for generating new approaches and innovation.